News Notes

Pictures with Santa available at Mansion

On Sun., Dec. 5, the Lindsay Community Historical Society plans to have a special fundraising event – pictures with Santa – during “Christmas at the Mansion.”
“Christmas at the Mansion” will be held from 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. at the Mansion, located south of Lindsay on Hwy. 76, then west at Erin Springs for about a mile.
The money is to support repairs needed at the Mansion, according to Sheryl Kochert.
Due to the charitable, fundraising nature of this event, the only photos taken with Santa will be done by volunteer, Sheryl Kochert, on the third floor from 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Photos will be a Christmas theme.
The photos will be available by Fri., Dec. 17 at the Lindsay Community Library, located at 112 W. Choctaw in Lindsay.
Visitors are allowed to take photos of their children in other areas of the Mansion which are decorated for Christma

News Notes

‘Christmas at the Mansion’ is Sunday

Come celebrate Christmas at the Murray-Lindsay Mansion on Sun., Dec. 5, from 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m.” That’s the word from Shawn Bridwell of the Lindsay Commjunity Historical Society.
Visitors will be able to walk through the beautifully decorated historic Mansion.
Photos with Santa (with a photographer) will be available on the third floor.
Visitors will also be treated to punch, cider, cookies, and snacks.
The Murray family moved in to the Mansion just in time for their first Christmas in December of 1881.
“Come step back in time with us this year, once again,” Mr. Bridwell added.
The Murray-Lindsay Mansion is located just south of Lindsay on Hwy. 76, then west about a mile at Erin Springs.
“Mark your calendars! We look forward to seeing you there,” Mr. Bridwell conclud

News Notes

Pauls Valley Opry changes venue for one show

The Pauls Valley Opry is changing its location/venue for the Sat., Dec 4 show, according to Becky Hill.
Due to the lack of heat in the high school auditorium, the Opry is relocating to the Pauls Valley JUNIOR HIGH AUDITORIUM (on the corner of N. Chickasaw and Guy Streets).
Entrance will be through the school’s main entrance on Guy Street. Additional parking for the event will be at the First Assembly of God church on N. Chickasaw Street. Parking is also available at the First United Methodist Church and the Courthouse.
The show begins at 6:30 p.m.
We apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may cause. Monthly Opry shows are planned to resume in February. There will be no show on January 1st.
“Please watch Facebook and your local papers for information concerning location of future shows,” Ms. Hill concluded.

News Notes

Gift items available at Murray-Lindsay Mansion

The Lindsay Community Historical Society has a Special Offer on Gift Items at the Murray Lindsay Mansion through December, according to Thelma Love.
Christmas Ornaments with pictures of historic buildings including the Methodist Church of Lindsay would make great gifts.
The Pikes Peak History Book is on special offer through December.
Those who would like more information, or to make arrangements to see these items may call 405-919-6146.
The Murray Lindsay Mansion and the Pikes Peak School Museums will only be open by appointment through the Winter Months.

News Notes

Happy Thanksgiving

The first Thanksgiving was a harvest celebration held by the pilgrims of Plymouth colony in the 17th century.
The first Thankgiving feast was held to celebrate the successful fall harvest. Celebrating a fall harvest was an English tradition at the time, and the pilgrims had much to celebrate and thank God for.
There were 53 pilgrims at the first Thanksgiving – the only colonists who survived the long journey on the Mayflower and the first winter in the New World.
They survived with the help of the local Wampanoag tribe, 90 of whom were guests at the feast. One of the tribe members, a young man named Squanto, spoke fluent English, and had been appointed by their leader, Massasoit, as the pilgrim’s translator and guide.
The feast celebrated by the pilgrims in 1621 was never actually called “Thanksgiving” by the colonists. A few years later, in July 1623, the pilgrims did hold what they called a “Thanksgiving,” a religious day of prayer and fasting that had nothing to do with the fall harvest.
In 1789, George Washington declared the last Thursday in November a national Thanksgiving. Other presidents did not continue the declaration, though.
Finally, Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. America was in the middle of its bloody Civil War at the time, and Lincoln hoped the new holiday would unify the bitterly divided country.
This year, the folks at the Shopper wish our readers a safe and happy Thanksgiving. We give thanks to God for our many blessings, and we ask The Lord to bless this great nation.